Articles Posted in Litigation

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My partner, Jon Welner, is a leading practitioner of prevailing wage law in California and is the Chair of JMBM’s Prevailing Wage Group. He is also a member of JMBM’s Natural Resources and Mining Group and advises and defends the construction materials industry on prevailing wage matters including recent California legislation to expand prevailing wage law to cover the delivery of concrete to public work sites (AB 219).

— Kerry Shapiro

The U.S. Court of Appeals Has Revived AB 219 Once Again!

by Jon Welner

PREVAILING WAGE LAW is California’s “other” minimum wage. It requires workers to be paid union wages on publicly funded construction projects. But in recent years, the law in California has EXPANDED well beyond its initial purpose. It has become a tool for workers to demand union wages on virtually any construction project in California. These claims can increase the cost of a major construction project by millions of dollars–and can be brought years after construction is complete.

 

In a dizzying turn of events, the U.S. Court of Appeals has revived AB 219 for a second time. Less than three weeks ago, I posted an article describing how the U.S. District Court issued a permanent injunction overturning AB 219, effectively striking it down for the second time. Now it’s back!

A Quick Recap

AB 219 took effect on July 1, 2016. It applied California prevailing wage requirements to the delivery of ready-mix concrete to public works. This was big news for two reasons: (1) it hit the ready-mix concrete industry—and all of the businesses that depend on it—very hard; and (2) it represents the first time that prevailing wage requirements have been imposed on material suppliers (as opposed to on-site contractors).

On June 30, 2016—the day before AB 219 took effect—eight ready-mix companies filed a lawsuit in federal court challenging the constitutionality of the new statute on Equal Protection grounds. In essence, they argued it was unfair to single out ready-mix concrete companies for special treatment, leaving all other material suppliers unaffected. Continue reading

Published on:

My partner, Jon Welner, is a leading practitioner of prevailing wage law in California and is the Chair of JMBM’s Prevailing Wage Group. He is also a member of JMBM’s Natural Resources and Mining Group and advises and defends the construction materials industry on prevailing wage matters including recent California legislation to expand prevailing wage law to cover the delivery of concrete to public work sites (AB 219).

— Kerry Shapiro

New CA Prevailing Wage Law Suspended by Federal Court!

By Jon Welner

PREVAILING WAGE LAW is California’s “other” minimum wage. It requires workers to be paid union wages on publicly funded construction projects. But in recent years, the law in California has EXPANDED well beyond its initial purpose. It has become a tool for workers to demand union wages on virtually any construction project in California. These claims can increase the cost of a major construction project by millions of dollars–and can be brought years after construction is complete.

U.S. District Court Suspends New Law that Made Deliveries of Concrete Subject to California Prevailing Wage (AB 219)

In a surprise move, the U.S. District Court in Los Angeles issued an Order today blocking implementation of AB 219, a new statute that added the delivery of ready-mix concrete to the growing list of activities covered by California Prevailing Wage Law. (Please see my prior post on AB 219 for additional background.)

AB 219 was passed last year and took effect on July 1, 2016. The new law imposed massive new burdens on the ready-mix industry, including complex new record-keeping and tracking requirements. On June 30, 2016, a group of eight ready-mix companies filed a lawsuit challenging the new statute as a violation of Equal Protection and federal law. The Court granted the plaintiffs’ motion for a preliminary injunction on October 18, 2016.

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by Kerry Shapiro

As reported earlier this week, the recent Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals decision in Center for Biological Diversity v. Salazar allowed a uranium mine on federal lands in Arizona to re-open after being idled for seventeen years absent any new federal approval or supplemental environmental review. This decision is notable on its own, but carries added significance in California, where it now highlights a potential conflict between federal and state law regarding idle mines and the resumption of mining operations at such mines.

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